Carmot ODL (7) – various

This post is number 7 in a sequence of 7.  Click here to get to the beginning. The ‘<on>’ and ‘<no>’ symbols The ‘<on>’ and ‘<no>’ symbols are used to begin and end the definition of a type…

Carmot ODL (6) – inheritance

This post is number 6 in a sequence of 7.  Click here to get to the beginning. The ‘:’ symbol – type inheritance Many of the goals of the Carmot language have parallels in intent, if not in…

Carmot ODL (5) – echo fields

This post is number 5 in a sequence of 7.  Click here to get to the beginning. The ‘><’, ‘><><‘, and ‘?><‘ symbols – echo fields The echo field symbols were added to the Carmot language in order…

Carmot ODL (4) – ‘@@’

This post is number 4 in a sequence of 7.  Click here to get to the beginning. The ‘@@’ symbol – relative collection reference The ‘@@’ symbol, as one might expect given the meaning of the ‘@’ symbol…

Carmot ODL (3) – ‘##’

This post is number 3 in a sequence of 7.  Click here to get to the beginning. The ‘##’ symbol – persistent collection ref. The ‘##’ symbol, as one might expect given the meaning of the ‘#’ symbol,…

Carmot ODL (2) – ‘#’

This post is number 2 in a sequence of 7.  Click here to get to the beginning. The ‘#’ symbol – Persistent ref. The persistent reference symbol ‘#’ is used to denote a one-to-one reference from…

Carmot ODL (1) – ‘@’

As mentioned previously (see here), the Carmot ontology definition language (ODL) is an extension of the C programming language, which itself is perhaps the most widespread and fundamental high level language in existence.  Not only does Carmot…